Module 3: Basic Security Procedures:

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You made it to the end of Module 3!  By the time you’re reading this, you should of received an e-mail automatically with all of your responses.  It is also displayed below for your reference.  

After reviewing the below, you will then proceed to do an end of module quiz of everything you learned in module 3.  So make sure you study below!

NEGLIGENCE ON DUTY:

  1. Not patrolling.
  2. Sleeping during your shift.
  3. Filing false reports.
  4. Making false notebook entries.
  5. Impaired by narcotics and/or alcohol.
  6. Leaving site without permission.
  7. Failure to act.
  8. Using excessive force.
  9. Making a false arrest.
  10. Using profanity and/or unprofessional conduct towards client.

If in doubt, check with your supervisor.

 

ACCESS CONTROL:
Access control is controlling the movement of people, vehicles, materials, and information into and out of a site.

 

WHY ACCESS CONTROL?
Access controls may be required for any of the following five reasons:

  1. To issue or withhold material or information.
  2. To permit, authorize, or deny a person’s use of a privilege or right.
  3. To control the speed of access to or from, or the rate of movement within a defined place.
  4. To control persons, material or information against unauthorized observation or removal.
  5. To prevent injury to persons or damage to goods and materials.


WHAT WILL YOU CONTROL?

In access control, you will control:

  1. The movement of people.
  2. The movement of vehicles.
  3. The movement of property, goods and materials.
  4. Access to information and data.

Access control is accomplished by the use of:

  1. Physical systems.
  2. Personnel (security guards), or
  3. A combination of the above.

The security guard’s role is twofold:

  1. To exercise access control in their own right through their presence and interactions with people.
  2. To interact with the physical systems, by monitoring inspecting, operating, ect.

ACCESS OF PEOPLE:
Techniques for controlling the movement of people include:

  1. Locked doors and barriers.
  2. Magnetic entry cards.
  3. Personal recognition.
  4. Identification cards.
  5. Log book.

VISITOR’S LOG BOOK:
A visitor log book contains some key information:

  1. Name of the person visiting.
  2. Time in and out.
  3. Destination on site.

 

OTHER POSSIBLE INFORMATION TO BE RECORDED ON THE SHEET:

  1. Signature of the visitor.
  2. Name of the company person is with.
  3. Name of ID document shown to prove identity.
  4. Nature of business on site.
  5. Name and/or signature of employee signing visitor in.
  6. Number of visitor pass issued.
  7. Name and/or initials of security guard on duty when entry was made.

HOW TO KEEP A GOOD SIGN-IN LOG:

  1. Be consistent.
  2. Check all entries for completeness, accuracy, and legibility.
  3. Make sure signature is legible or name is printed.
  4. Do not use or allow the use of ditto marks.
  5. Do not allow people to be signed in advance of their actual arrival.
  6. Ensure that times out are diligently recorded as times in.
  7. Always sign people out when they leave, even if they intend to return later in the day.

SHIFT HANDOVER:
Communication is key when a shift change occurs.  Because the guard that you are relieving is unaware of the events that occurred on your shift, it is imperative that you take a couple of minutes to pass on any information to the next guard that may be relevant of knowing (i.e. an elevator is out of service, so you pass on the information to the next guard to tell all residents not to use the elevator until properly repaired). 

PASS ON BOOK:
A pass on book acts as an information booklet of the summary of events at a particular site.  Every time a security guard completes his or her shift, they should enter a brief log inside the pass on book explaining the summary of events that have occurred on their shift, regardless if it was quiet for the entire duration.  Information that needs to be logged in for each log submission should include:

  1. Your name.
  2. Date and shift start/end times
  3. A summary of your shift.
  4. Your signature
  5. A straight line just underneath your signature which signifies a new entry can be written.

Pass on books are a useful and crucial tool for communication.  It keeps all security guards informed about the events that are occurring on that particular site.  Not all sites have 24 hour security, so a pass on book definitely helps relaying information to the next guard. 

UNAUTHORIZED ACCESS:
When someone attempts unauthorized access:

  1. Politely state the policy.
  2. Find out what the person wants and offer alternative solutions.
  3. Be firm in requiring compliance.
  4. Offer person choice between consequences of compliance and consequences of non-compliance.
  5. Where confrontation may escalate, request assistance, keep calm, and keep visual contact.

 

ACCESS OF VEHICLES:
Three main security guard responsibilities for gate or entrance duty:

  1. Ensure only authorized vehicles access a location.
  2. Prevent unauthorized removal of equipment from a location.
  3. Maintain a log of vehicles entering and leaving an area.

CONTROL OF VEHICLES:
The techniques of controlling the movement of vehicles include:

  1. Gates, barricades, guard booth.
  2. Approved list of vehicles.
  3. Pass on windshield.
  4. Visual recognition.
  5. Log book.

TYPES OF VEHICLES:
The types of vehicles entering a site can be broadly described as:

  1.  
  2.  
  3.  
  4.  
  5.  
  6.  

DELIVERIES, PARCELS, AND MAIL:
Some guidelines for controlling incoming deliveries parcels, and mail:

  1. Do not sign for packages until you have been authorized.
  2. Do not store for safekeeping unless authorized.
  3. Do not open or tamper with unless authorized.


REMOVAL OF MATERIAL AND EQUIPMENT:

  • Office furnishings and equipment are not to be removed from a site without the consent of the appropriate management representative of the client or employer.
  • If an employee attempts to do so, politely ask them if they are authorized to do so. Do not attempt to stop them if they insist.  If you are uncertain as to the legitimacy of the person’s authorization, contact your supervisor. 
  • Note the name of the person and the items removed on your shift report.

 

SEARCHING EMPLOYEES:

  • Security guards have no authority to search people other than pursuant to the agreed upon terms of employment which exist between employers and employees.
  • No security guard should ever initiate a search unless clearly instructed by a supervisor, the client, or post orders.
  • Where searches do occur, they are limited to searches of bags and parcels.
  • Security guards do not do body searches.
  • On most sites where searches do occur, the bag and parcel is opened by the owner, not the security guard.
  • Security guards have no authority to physically restrain a person who refuses to submit to a search.

In order to effectively conduct this sensitive task, a security guard should:

  1. Approach the individual in a friendly, non-threatening manner.
  2. Greet the individual and identify him/herself.
  3. Advise the individual that you would like to search the contents of the package.
  4. Have the owner remove items and then return them to the package.
  5. Thank the individual for their cooperation.

DRUG EFFECTS:
Security guards may encounter individuals under the influence of drugs, and/or alcohol.  Both impact human behavior.

INTERACTION WITH INDIVIDUALS UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DRUGS AND/OR ALCOHOL:

  • Avoid
  • Do your best to avoid them causing themselves physical injury especially through falling. Help them to a safe seat or the floor.

Do not leave them alone, and continue to monitor their situation.

·       If required, call an ambulance for medical assistance.

Pausing your training: